Jump to content


Photo

Scanning Tutorial


  • Please log in to reply
35 replies to this topic

#21 chris74801

chris74801

    Rookie

  • Newbie
  • 1 posts
  • Covers:13

Posted 11 February 2009 - 12:19 AM

Very informative but I also only see one picture.

#22 mMm-FALKEN

mMm-FALKEN

    Special Operation

  • Elite Member
  • 1,171 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:Design
  • Covers:268

  • Rank (last 60 days):
    37th in Music DVD
    2nd in PC Apps
    7th in PC Games

Posted 28 February 2009 - 09:36 PM

QUOTE(chris74801 @ Feb 10 2009, 06:19 PM)
Very informative but I also only see one picture.

View Post


Do u Need any help with covers chris74801

5292088488.png


#23 earthmover

earthmover

    Rookie

  • Newbie
  • 1 posts
  • Covers:100

  • Rank (last 60 days):
    61st in DVD Movie

Posted 03 January 2010 - 09:42 AM

Regarding resizing, I've noticed that Blu-ray inserts tend to be slightly smaller than the ones we're used to with SD DVDs. Any guidance on acceptable/required sizes for these?

#24 john_r

john_r

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • 114 posts
  • Covers:235

  • Rank (last 60 days):
    12th in Other Console

Posted 29 December 2011 - 10:23 AM

  • scanning is better done at 600dpi only using the descreen option then color correct unsharp mask resize to standard amary case then you lose no quality all work should be done at higher resolution as for flattening put between heavy books and put in your fridge for 20 mins perfectly flat cover perfect for scanning
  • also added video i used on how to template a scan when i first started

Attached Files


Design is an adventure into an unknown world, which can only be explored by those willing to take the risks.

#25 nikama75

nikama75

    Rookie

  • Newbie
  • 1 posts
  • Covers:0

Posted 14 October 2012 - 02:21 AM

Hi! What is best (easy use) program. I'm printing CD-ROM (audio), DVD-R (music videos & PC-games) etc... Now I use "UnderCoverXP". Not good. Back-cover don't match.

#26 steph_1963

steph_1963

    Rookie

  • Newbie
  • 2 posts
  • Covers:0

Posted 13 January 2013 - 07:54 PM

I'm new to this i just found this site. what kind of paper, printer and app.do i need.
thks :-)

#27 Adamsy

Adamsy

    Advanced Member

  • Elite Member
  • 63 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Peterlee, Co. Durham
  • Covers:158

  • Rank (last 60 days):
    44th in PC Games
    3rd in Playstation 3
    3rd in Xbox 360

Posted 17 February 2013 - 12:04 PM

A better scanning tutorial (with pictures). I take no credit for the making of this, i found it ages ago so thought i'd upload it.
http://rapidshare.co...nning Guide.pdf

#28 sarayvonne

sarayvonne

    Rookie

  • Member
  • 13 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Northern Michigan
  • Interests:Horror/dark comedies
  • Covers:0

Posted 19 June 2013 - 10:09 AM

I'm new to this i just found this site. what kind of paper, printer and app.do i need.
thks :-)

i like to buy cardstock to print covers.  i have a deskjet printer and have had no problems using thicker paper like cardstock.



#29 TheOnlyMrVideo

TheOnlyMrVideo

    Senior Member

  • Gold Member
  • 54 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Madison, WI
  • Covers:15

Posted 12 July 2013 - 08:26 AM

The tutorial is a little hard to follow because it is consists of HTML code.  The images are too small to convey the changes resulting from the described step.  Putting the whole thing together in a PDF, with much larger images would be a plus for everyone.

 

The differences that I have are

 

1) I scan at 1200 DPI.  Makes it easier to find any dust bunnies that I managed not to get off the scanner.  Plus, it is the native DPI of my 11x17 flatbed scanner. IMHO, doing corrections with the highest possible scan resolution is better than doing correction on lower resolutions.

 

2) DO NOT use the scanners edges, as no scanner that I know of scans with the edges at pixel number one. A portion of the two sides is cropped.

 

Build a T-square if you have a 11x17" flatbed scanner.  That way the covers you scan will always be in the same location, making scanning of multiple covers easier, i.e., no resetting of the preview edges.  Plus, they will be away from the edges of the scanner, so ALL of the cover gets scanned.  Add some margin to the scan, which you then crop within Photoshop. If you have a smaller scanner, one of those thin plastic rulers can be used against one edge of the scanner.  That will get the cover away from the one edge.  You can then just place the cover on the scanner away from the other edge.



#30 2getted

2getted

    To Each Their Own

  • Gold Member
  • 110 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Covers:508

  • Rank (last 60 days):
    25th in DVD Movie

Posted 14 July 2013 - 04:40 PM

... 
1) I scan at 1200 DPI.  Makes it easier to find any dust bunnies that I managed not to get off the scanner.  Plus, it is the native DPI of my 11x17 flatbed scanner. IMHO, doing corrections with the highest possible scan resolution is better than doing correction on lower resolutions.
 
...

 
I suggest the site http://www.scantips.com for excellent advice on how to get the most out of your scanner.
 
The suggestion to scan at 1200DPI is not a good idea for most IMAO for covers and labels. Photos and film is different but covers, labels and magazines are printed with a halftone printing process which will give you a poor result if scanned at a high setting.
With a scan above 600DPI the scanners software will interpolate the result to get to the higher resolutions. The scanner is not performing a true 1200DPI but is using software techniques to attempt to 'improve' a lower resolution into a interpolated higher resolution. This is true for most scanners bought for the home user.
Scanning at 600DPI, fixing any noise, moire, colour correction, etc and then saving the image at 300DPI will generally give the best result. But this is not always the case. I have had better results with scanning at 300DPI compared to 600DPI with some covers. Of course don't forget the scanner's descreen and unsharpen options.


Laughing.man.gif


#31 TheOnlyMrVideo

TheOnlyMrVideo

    Senior Member

  • Gold Member
  • 54 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Madison, WI
  • Covers:15

Posted 15 July 2013 - 03:30 AM

I would agree with you, if the native DPI of the scanner is not 600 DPI or 1200 DPI.  My Epson GT-15000 is a 11x17 600x1200 DPI scanner.

 

With this scanner, I've never run into issues scanning at 1200 DPI.  No problems with the halftone CMYK linescreen dots.

 

I do not like the descreen or unsharpen options.  Especially the descreen.  To me it softens the image really bad.

 

That is my scanner, so YMMV.  It never hurts to test the capabilities of the scanner's output in Photoshop, GIMP, or whatever.

 

So, in my posting above, I should have added more about my observations over the years, as well as the note about YMMV,



#32 2getted

2getted

    To Each Their Own

  • Gold Member
  • 110 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Covers:508

  • Rank (last 60 days):
    25th in DVD Movie

Posted 15 July 2013 - 07:56 AM

Then you have to consider is your scanner using a CCD sensor or a CIS chip, lol.

Also not using the descreen and unsharp options are all good to state but unless you're adept with Photoshop, Paintshop, or some other graphics program then the images scanned, especially the labels, will need to have a lot of work done on them to reduce the moire due to the halftone method used to print the originals.

With newer scanners nowadays the descreen and unsharp options provide an effective method to reduce the moire and a simple way for most people to scan to a good image.

Most scanners have the ability to compensate during the scan of halftone-printed material and this is done by enabling the descreen option in the printer software (descreen 'undoes' the screen printed halftone process). If you turn on descreen and then perform a new scan, the difference (especially if you are using a good flatbed scanner) can be quite remarkable.

If you do not see an option for 'DeScreen' in your scanner software, sometimes the option is presented as a selection of either 'Photo' or 'Magazine' - you need to select 'Magazine' which represents all printed materials (real photographic images are not printed in the same way so you should never use descreen when scanning a traditionally printed photo).

As you stated, the scan done with descreen is a little less sharp than the non-descreened version. This can be corrected easily in the graphics package with the scanner using a simple unsharp mask filter. It will look significantly better than a scan done without Descreen that then has some other correction applied to it.

Bottom line for most people - use descreen and unsharp. Try a scan with these options off and on and compare the result.


Laughing.man.gif


#33 TheOnlyMrVideo

TheOnlyMrVideo

    Senior Member

  • Gold Member
  • 54 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Madison, WI
  • Covers:15

Posted 15 July 2013 - 05:02 PM

I have done test with the descreen amd unsharp  filters and do not like them.  I just do not seem to end up with Moire patterns, resulting from the beat frequency of the scanner's DPI setting and the halftone LPI setting.  I really like the quality of this EPSON  11x17 flatbed scanner.  Can't even find them anymore.



#34 Jaclynvef

Jaclynvef

    Junior Member

  • Member
  • 30 posts
  • Covers:0

Posted 18 January 2018 - 01:02 AM

Incredible! This blog looks just like my old one!

#35 Jaclynvef

Jaclynvef

    Junior Member

  • Member
  • 30 posts
  • Covers:0

Posted 18 January 2018 - 01:05 AM

Whoa! This blog looks just like my old one!

#36 Jaclynvef

Jaclynvef

    Junior Member

  • Member
  • 30 posts
  • Covers:0

Posted 18 January 2018 - 01:06 AM

Wow! This blog looks exactly like my old one!